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Below are some stats regarding Stress Urinary Incontinence that I feel are worth reading.  I had planned to add them to my FB Live, but feel they have more impact when read.  

There seems to be a disconnect between women and clinicians when describing symptoms.  Awareness is key and not all women understand that although Stress Urinary Incontinence can be a typical postpartum symptom....its not something we have to live with.  Its a symptom that can be pushed under the rug and excused due to lack of knowledge on the part of both the clinician and patient.  

Mommy Ready is striving to create this awareness and knowledge to women immediately postpartum and women with continued symptoms after many years have pas...

The path for many into postpartum depression is gradual, so much so, that it can be difficult to tell that the water is hot because it warmed up so slowly.  For others, a more abrupt change is seen, particularly with loss (a death, a divorce) or a perceived loss. Nearly every mother I've spoken to has felt at some time what we term Baby Blues, simply by the nature of what we've been through. 

The physical and emotional stress of childbirth.

Elevated hormones that mimic our stress response. 

Foods that stress our bodies ability to maintain homeostasis.

Lack of restorative sleep and time to care for ourselves.

All of these things push us toward or past our threshold to maintain homeostasis, to cope, and we begin to decompensate.  For...

February 3, 2018

Postpartum Depression (PPD). Let's talk about it...why it happens, who it happens to and how to tell if you are experiencing symptoms? I am passionate about this subject as I experienced it myself. I want to share my story with you.  

Having my first child, I thought things would be easy. I read all the books and had so many great friends and moms surrounding me. I exercised, slept and had a supportive husband. My daughter was healthy and happy --so why wasn't I?  

Symptoms of PPD can be tricky to identify because the early weeks of motherhood are challenging to both the mind and body, and so many changes are happening at once.  

Symptoms include:

  • difficulty sleeping

    ...

September 17, 2017

One of Life's Greatest Miracles is the creation of a new Life.  

 We all know there are many biological and physiological happenings during pregnancy.  But I want to focus on the musculoskeletal happenings during pregnancy.

As the baby forms in the uterus, the abdominal muscles are required to expand and stretch.  The baby continues to grow and these muscles also need to make more room for the organs that are being crowded out.

The lungs get pushed upward, intestines are off to the side and that poor bladder!!!!  

Then throw in the stress to the abdominal muscles during actual labor.  They don't call it "labor" because its easy!  OR say you are required to have a c-section.  Well, then your core system is compromised in yet another dir...

September 1, 2017

Being a mom is one of the toughest, yet most rewarding jobs in the world. Sounds cliche, I know. Before I became a mom, I never knew just how much physical strength mommy-ing requires. Lifting, holding, bending, pushing. All with a wriggling 10 pound being that can't even hold his head up!  

So how do I become the Super Mom, that takes care of my Super Baby? 

Here at Mommy Ready, we've found that finding Super Strength comes through correct core function. Learning how to use your core muscles (abs, pelvic floor, etc.) properly after childbirth is what we teach you in the Mommy Ready Postpartum program.    

Imagine your core muscle group as a cylinder around your spine....

February 10, 2017

Preparing for childbirth is something I've been thinking about a lot recently as I was awaiting a new precious baby. I've been able to refine my methods over the years which I'm grateful for because I started out doing absolutely nothing. With my first baby, I had no idea what I was getting into and I went into labor blind. I had no coaching, no training, no previous experience watching another woman have a child, nothing at all. I'm grateful that I had youth and ignorance on my side. I have since given birth to eight more children. Over that time I've been able to see the value in preparing myself and it has drastically impacted my health, before and after childbirth. Here's what I do now to prepare my body and mind for childbirth....

October 14, 2016

Many women after having a baby were surprised that their tummy didn't return to pre-pregnancy shape after delivery.  Most women expect some change in their physique, but when abdominal weakness and bulging persists months or years after pregnancy, it seems reasonable to start to feel discouraged.  I've found that persisting weakness and a bulge often has less to do with "extra baby weight" and more to do with how your innermost abdominal muscles have recovered (or not recovered) after childbirth.  

More than half of childbearing women will experience a diastasis or separation of the Rectus Abdominis muscle.  Some diastasis heal on their own during postpartum recovery.  Women who have a diastasis longer...

Diastasis = separation 

[dahy-as-tuh-sis]

Rectus Abdominis = a pair of long flat muscles that run from the breast bone to the pubic bone along the front of the abdomen (your six-pack muscle). 

The Linea Alba or "White Line" is the name of the connective tissue that joins the left and right sides of this paired muscle.  The rectus abdominis muscle is separated by connective tissue into 8 segments and joins into a thick fascia (no muscle just thin connective tissue, actually a flat tendon) about 1/3 of the way below the belly button.  The connective tissue of the linea alba is made up of the lining of the lateral abdominal muscles, in layers including the internal and external obliques which make up the upper layers, and...

September 8, 2016

Each woman comes into pregnancy and leaves childbirth with her own unique experiences and problems.  Therefore, each woman's recovery after delivery would benefit from a provider who can evaluate her specific needs and address her unique concerns.

Too often, common concerns such as occasional leaking urine, persisting pelvic pain, prolapse and abdominal weakness are met with limited options. An OB/GYN may offer surgery but may recommend against it if future pregnancies are desired or the mother is too young. Kegels or pelvic floor exercises may be recommended but with little more than a handout as a guide. Many women tell me they already do kegels or that they've even seen a traditional pelvic floor therapist but feel discouraged because...

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July 8, 2018

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