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October 27, 2017

A postpartum exercise program can be key to improving your ability to confidently and energetically care for your new baby, decrease your risk of injury and allow you to regain your pre-pregnancy physique.

Approximately 50% of women experience pain either during pregnancy or postpartum. 50%.  That's half of all of you that read this article.  

  

Parenting is a physically taxing job.  Repetitive stress from the daily activities required to care for a baby puts a woman at risk for disc injury, chronic back pain or muscle and ligament injury.

We know that during pregnancy our ligaments become slack due to the hormone, relaxin.  This is to allow our bodies to adapt to carrying a growing child inside of us.

Therefore, pregnancy r...

September 17, 2017

One of Life's Greatest Miracles is the creation of a new Life.  

 We all know there are many biological and physiological happenings during pregnancy.  But I want to focus on the musculoskeletal happenings during pregnancy.

As the baby forms in the uterus, the abdominal muscles are required to expand and stretch.  The baby continues to grow and these muscles also need to make more room for the organs that are being crowded out.

The lungs get pushed upward, intestines are off to the side and that poor bladder!!!!  

Then throw in the stress to the abdominal muscles during actual labor.  They don't call it "labor" because its easy!  OR say you are required to have a c-section.  Well, then your core system is compromised in yet another dir...

October 14, 2016

Many women after having a baby were surprised that their tummy didn't return to pre-pregnancy shape after delivery.  Most women expect some change in their physique, but when abdominal weakness and bulging persists months or years after pregnancy, it seems reasonable to start to feel discouraged.  I've found that persisting weakness and a bulge often has less to do with "extra baby weight" and more to do with how your innermost abdominal muscles have recovered (or not recovered) after childbirth.  

More than half of childbearing women will experience a diastasis or separation of the Rectus Abdominis muscle.  Some diastasis heal on their own during postpartum recovery.  Women who have a diastasis longer...

THANK YOU to all the wonderful mommies, and medical providers, who joined us for our first two Mommy Ready Events!

If you missed out on our last Mommy Ready Events in Anacortes, WA and Heber City, UT, you're in luck!  Find out about all our upcoming events by subscribing to our newsletter!

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The event at Penny Ranch in UT, we discovered what the core system is and how it stops working (or we teach it not to work) after pregnancy.  A gentle yoga session afterwards helped participants to identify and reconnect to each core muscle. We also experimented with diaphragm exercises and movements to relax, support and help heal the body from the inside out!

Our event in Anacortes, after finding the "missing core" and discussing co...

Core dysfunction is so common that nearly every mother experiences it at some point.  Many women improve on their own during postpartum recovery (before 8 weeks), but over half of women don't.  Read on to learn more about the core system that is responsible for keeping you strong and protecting you against injury (as well as having a flat belly and a defined waistline) and what happens when this system has stopped working.  

 

What is the core system?

The core "system" is made up of 4 parts that create a cylinder.  The top is the diaphragm and proper breathing is part of a core-system that works.  The tube in the center is made up of the transverse abdominis (TA) that has a fascia or connective tissue that con...

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July 8, 2018

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